“Prose both scabrous and poetic.” – Publishers Weekly. “Proust meets Chandler over a pint of Guinness.” – Spectator. “A sheer pleasure.” – Tana French. “Among the most memorable books of the year, of any genre.” – Sunday Times. “A hardboiled delight.” – Guardian. “Imagine Donald Westlake and Richard Stark collaborating on a screwball noir.” – Kirkus Reviews. “A cross between Raymond Chandler and Flann O’Brien.” – John Banville. “The effortless cool of Elmore Leonard at his peak.” – Ray Banks. “A fine writer at the top of his game.” – Lee Child.

Monday, September 24, 2012

“Ya Wanna Do It Here Or Down The Station, Punk?” Marian Keyes

Yep, it’s rubber-hose time, folks: a rapid-fire Q&A for those shifty-looking usual suspects ...

What crime novel would you most like to have written?
The first book by Nicci French. I think it was called THE MEMORY GAME, it’s a long time since I read it but I remember being awestruck by the subject matter (‘retrieved’ memories of childhood abuse) and all the twists and turns that go with something as unreliable as that.

What fictional character would you most like to have been?
I’d like to be Faith Zanetti from the series by Anna Blundy. She’s tough and cool and funny.

Who do you read for guilty pleasures?
I don’t think any reading should be regarded as a guilty pleasure. If you’re enjoying whatever you’re reading, then there’s no need to apologise for it.

If you could recommend one Irish crime novel, what would it be?
Ah here! There are so many brilliant books and if I pick one, all the writers I didn’t choose will take agin me. [Ed - I'm afraid I'm going to have to put a gun to your head, ma'am.] However, as you have the gun to my head, I’m going to go for THE LIKENESS by Tana French because the atmosphere is so magical and strange and spooky.

Most satisfying writing moment?
I’d never written a ‘mystery’ book before THE MYSTERY OF MERCY CLOSE and plot-wise it was a big challenge, but most people don’t guess the whereabouts of my missing person. I was ‘quietly pleased’.

What Irish crime novel would make a great movie?
I’m not sure Kevin Barry will thank me for describing CITY OF BOHANE as a crime novel, but it is, as well as being about 800 different types of book. It’d be great to see the fantastic, colourful world he’s created, on the screen. (Mind you, I get cranky when people go on about turning books into films, as if the medium of books is somehow second-rate …)

The best thing about being a writer?
Getting to play with words. I love words. They’re beautiful things.

The pitch for your next book is …
My current book (THE MYSTERY OF MERCY CLOSE) is a missing persons case about a ex-boyband member who has disappeared five days before a massive reunion gig. Is that any good to you?

What are you reading right now?
GONE GIRL by Gillian Flynn. Bloody fantastic!!!

God appears and says you can only write OR read. Which would it be?
First of all I’d have strong words with God about the cruelty of the human condition. When I was finished berating him, I’d pick reading. I love writing but it’s very fecking hard.

The three best words to describe your own writing are …?
Conversational, dark, funny.

THE MYSTERY OF MERCY CLOSE by Marian Keyes is published by Michael Joseph.

2 comments:

bookdout said...

I enjoyed reading the interview, I really liked The Mystery of Mercy Close.

Shelleyrae @ Book'd out

Declan Burke said...

Thanks, Shelley. Mercy Close is a terrific read, alright - as funny as it is dark.