“Prose both scabrous and poetic.” – Publishers Weekly. “Proust meets Chandler over a pint of Guinness.” – Spectator. “A sheer pleasure.” – Tana French. “Among the most memorable books of the year, of any genre.” – Sunday Times. “A hardboiled delight.” – Guardian. “Imagine Donald Westlake and Richard Stark collaborating on a screwball noir.” – Kirkus Reviews. “A cross between Raymond Chandler and Flann O’Brien.” – John Banville. “The effortless cool of Elmore Leonard at his peak.” – Ray Banks. “A fine writer at the top of his game.” – Lee Child.

Wednesday, April 18, 2007

Lost Classics # 27: Quinn, Seamus Smyth

"Murder is such an emotive term. It implies malice ... But there's no malice in what I do." Teak-tough stuff from Seamus Smyth on his debut, with Gerd Quinn as his first-person borderline psycho Mr Fixit wreaking homicidal havoc in Dublin's crime world. You want a car-bomb wired up outside a kids' school? Yep, Quinn's yer only man ... and that's just for openers. An Irish Jim Thompson, and no mistake. It was too hardboiled for mass consumption when first released back in 1999, maybe, but Quinn's time has surely come around. Any chance of a re-release, folks?

1 comment:

Don Anderson said...

Okay, you talked me into it. My copy of QUINN will arrive today in the mail. I'm a fan of Bruen, Kernick, MacBride, McKinty, Guthrie, Rickards and similar noir stylists from across the pond. I'll let you know my thoughts when I finish my read.